What are the Bad Side Effects of Ibuprofen?

Ibuprofen is a type of pain reliever available most often over the counter under various brand names. Ibuprofen is most recognized for relieving the symptoms of fever and pain. It is what is known as a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Ibuprofen is not aspirin or acetaminophen. NSAIDs are most preferred for reducing symptoms that cause inflammation along with pain. 

The Background of Ibuprofen

Many physical symptoms that cause pain are a result of inflammation. Ibuprofen was approved for use in the United States in 1974. Ibuprofen was first released over the counter in 1983. Today most people are familiar with using Ibuprofen safely, so it does not require a doctor’s prescription. The most common brand names that anyone can buy for Ibuprofen include 

  • Advil
  • Motrin
  • Nuprin 
  • Advil Cold Medicines
  • Children’s Motrin 

The Most Well-Known Prescription Drugs That Are Opioids and Ibuprofen

Ibuprofen is also a standard medicine for relieving the symptoms of fever. Therefore, it is present in many cold and flu medications both over the counter and by prescription. Additionally, the types of medications containing Ibuprofen that require a doctor’s prescription include medicines that also contain opioids. This is because the preferred treatment for pain that requires a narcotic will often include Ibuprofen as the other ingredient or acetaminophen. The most well-known prescription drugs that are opioids and Ibuprofen include: 

  • Vicoprofen (hydrocodone containing ibuprofen)
  • Reprexain (hydrocodone containing ibuprofen)
  • Ibudone (hydrocodone containing ibuprofen)

What are the Bad Side Effects of Ibuprofen?

Can People Abuse Ibuprofen?

Ibuprofen is not considered a narcotic or an addictive drug. However, some people may develop a tolerance to the effects of Ibuprofen if they use it too regularly. Unfortunately, some people abuse Ibuprofen and begin to take mass amounts to treat their pain. This is not an addiction, but it is cause for concern. In addition, some people suffer from an emotional or mental health disorder who abuse safe medications because they suffer from symptoms related to their mental health. 

Many individuals with obsessive-compulsive disorders or anxiety, depression, bipolar, or other diagnoses may take too much medicine in desperation to feel better from their other emotional or mental health symptoms. 

What are the Bad Side Effects of Ibuprofen?

Anyone can experience harmful side effects from Ibuprofen. It is not reserved for people who are taking too much. However, it can become life-threatening for persons using twice or three times the amount indicated to take to cure pain or fever. The National Center for Biotechnology Information advances in science and health state how dangerous Ibuprofen is and what the bad side effects include. They emphasize how gastrointestinal illness is the primary adverse side effect. 

From the first day of use, all NSAIDs [Ibuprofen] increase the risk of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, myocardial infarction, and stroke. All NSAIDs increase bleeding and cardiovascular disease (CVD) and are more likely to cause cardiovascular events. In contrast, less selective NSAIDs are more likely to cause GI bleeds. The risk of bleeding and cardiovascular events is considerably higher in older people, who take medicines known to interact with NSAIDs. NSAIDs [also] affect the cardiovascular, renal, and respiratory systems; they increase systolic blood pressure and increase fluid retention. In patients taking coifs, All NSAIDs double the risk of hospitalization due to heart failure. (NCBI

Start Healing From Ibuprofen Abuse at Evoke Wellness Today!

It is safest to limit your intake of Ibuprofen. Never use more than the allowed dosage when taking Ibuprofen for a toothache, mild back strain, fever, menstrual cramps, sunburns, or other mild pain or swelling symptoms. To learn more about Ibuprofen abuse and addictive drugs that contain Ibuprofen, such as Vicoprofen, and other opioids that contain Ibuprofen, call, chat, or email our experts. We can connect you to the right counselor or doctor to help you today. 

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